After the Reboot - health focused discussion

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  • david.senderoff

    5 years ago


    Hi all, I'm on a reboot, my third actually in as many years. Looking for advice, encouragement, and support for afterward...sick of the yo-yo!

  • Kimberley

    5 years ago


    @ Dan



    I'm confused as to why you use your soak water from the nuts. I thought the purpose of soaking raw nuts was to get rid of enzyme inhibitors. Isn't it defeating the purpose if you use your soak water?

  • Barbara

    5 years ago


    Thanks once again, DanMiller for clarifying for me! I will order a nut bag and see how that goes. It seems the (raw, unpasteurized) almonds get a little fermenty while soaking. We have such great tap water here in Nebraska's Sandhills, that I never even thought of using purified water; I'll give that a try now, maybe a purifier on the spiggot would do?



    I let my junk-food addicted 4 and 8 yr. old granddaughters help make their orange juice here this weekend; they loved it, as they did the homemade chocolate syrup. Now for a natural yummy ice cream of some sort, and I'm betting there is something out there. . . one thing at a time! Thanks again, Dan! Headed over to wholevana :)

  • Barbara

    5 years ago


    Looks like they've changed up the page numbering, now most recent is on page 1, which is a good thing. But I think I have missed some comments/questions, plus we were gone for a while.



    Rachel - how are you liking your convenction/broiler/rotisserie oven. What brand did you get? I have been looking online for one. Also, one of my VERY favorite go-to, easy-to-make recipes in Forks Over Knives is the Orange Quinoa with Black Beans on page 240. It's great warm or cold, so is a super handy thing to have made up and in the fridge or to take along. I did the Braised Red Cabbage with Beans on page 181 that was really good, as was Baked Spaghetti Squash with Swiss Chard on page 185. I doubt there is a bad recipe in the book, everything so far is incredibly good.



    Question: I have been having some trouble with almond milk not keeping very well. A couple of times it was rank by second day. I try to rinse them several times while soaking, but wondering if I should I be roasting or dehydrating (after the initial soaking) before I make the milk. Same goes for almond and cashew butter. I finally realized, after much reading, that the almonds and cashews taste fabulous as a snack if I do this. Am drying at very low temps as recommended somewhere, which doesn't destroy the nutritional value as pastuerizing does.



    Which brings me to second question: Should I soak and dehydrate my sesame and sunflower seeds, as well as grains (when I get to that) as well. I read someplace that I should. I can see doing the sunflower seeds, but how would that work with sesame and grains? Thanks for any help out there.



    Good News: Had to fly to New England (we live in Nebraska) last week. On both outgoing and incoming trips, I sat next to people who were juicing. I was astonished. Both had seen FSND, were young (30 something) and bright. One a PhD doing pancreatic cancer research at Johns Hopkins, the other a young mother with fybromyalgia wanting to get a grip on the disease before it got worse. The word is getting out, thanks to Joe.

  • DanMiller BettyRae

    5 years ago

    Greetings again Barbara -- you really haven't missed too much on this discussion forum, as you were the last two postings...LOL.....To address your concerns on homemade almond milk. Every raw almond in this country has actually undergone a pasturization process -- even though they are classified as raw. they may be not roasted, not salted, but even raw nuts - particularly almonds are being pasturized :(

    Ideally, you want to find organic almonds to make your milk with and you want to use purified water to soak them in- no need to rinse too much or at all - you want to blend up that original soak water & soaked nuts - you want a soupy gruel with the original enzymes in the nut soak water. Also, if you are squeezing the milk with a gauze, that you make sure to wear gloves or have super clean hands & gauze. some folks use a nut bag, which holds the soaked pulp in such a way that squeezing the milk out is easy and more sanitary. You can wash the nut bag after use to alleviate bacterial contamination. It is some form of contaminant you are picking up that spoils the milk. My homemade almond milk lasts about 5-6 days properly strained and refridgerated. Do keep in mind that you are making home preparation so there is no preservatives or sterilizing used in this process like with conventional nut milks. After straining you can use the nut meal and dehydrate it in cracker recipes or for a nut sprinkle.

    If you roast the nuts, you defeat the purpose of soaking the nut. You want to soak 'raw' nuts to make your milk. same goes for if you want to make butters - use unsoaked raw nuts and a good butter maker apparatus (some masticating juicers will make butters by changing attachments). I do roast my raw snack nuts in a dehydrator at home and cover them with seasonings - delish, and as you say not roasted in the conventional sense at high heat and or/with salt or oil. When I make cashew cremes or sesame tahini, i soak the raw nuts/seeds and blend in a blender. I dehydrate the same for snacks or roasted seseme seed sprinkle. but is do not use roasted nuts to make my cashew creams or tahinis or butters.

    I LOVE the FOK cookbook and have used those recipes you mention and developed others based on those recipes- you are right the recipes are yummers and super simple. My favorite plant-based recipe website is located at: http://www.wholevana.com/recipes sign in an join there - they are the same folks who were featured in FOK movie and Kim Campbell and Howard have a great plant-based recipe section that enables you to meal plan and create shopping lists for all your family favorites without meat,dairy, eggs. Be sure to check out the purple tabs above here at RWJ - there are wonderful meatless monday entrees and delish desserts.

    Healthy Regards, Dan

    P.S. so happy to hear you spreading the word to airplane companions - this will only be a PlantPure Revolution at a grassroots level like this. Eat & Drink Plants.

  • DanMiller BettyRae

    5 years ago

    Two things I do differently from these instructions --- I use the soak water combined with fresh water to blend up the pulpy gruel, why waste those nutrients on plants - there is valuable enzymes in that soak water. And, I do not add sweetener, flavors etc...., i like my nut milks plain and simple. Definitely, nut bag is most convenient for sanitary squeezing. Eat & Drink Plants!

  • wanabwrestler

    5 years ago
    Hey Barbara! LOVING the toaster oven! It is soooo helpful and I use it every day! Rotisserie works too! Sooo yummy! I got the Hamilton Beach 31100 Countertop Oven with Convection and Rotisserie ( http://www.amazon.com/Hamilton-Beach-Countertop-Convection-Rotisserie/dp/B0059KY05M/ref=sr_1_16?s=appliances&ie=UTF8&qid=1392915485&sr=1-16&keywords=toaster+convection+oven ) and I highly reccomend as it holds a lot fo food and does so much! Thanks for the recipe suggestions! I tried the braised cabbage one you mentioned-- great-- and also the sweet potato white bean hash-- also great--. For the recipes not sounding appetizing they are all surprisingly amazing! Sincerly, Rachekl
  • Barbara

    5 years ago


    Loving the fresh almond milk that Jon inspired me to make and thanks to SinAz, who helped me find the good almonds. Not liking my cheesecloth method of straining it - there must be a better way! Am also drying the meal in a low (200) oven for a couple hours. Haven't used any yet, ideas welcome, getting quite a stash.



    I made some chocolate syrup with maple syrup, cacao and coconut oil, so now we can have the best-ever hot chocolate with almond milk on these below zero days as a special treat!



    Merry, Healthy Christmas everyone!

  • DanMiller BettyRae

    5 years ago

    sorry I overlooked your almond meal question Barbara -- here is my answer. I use that almond meal a couple of different ways. 1.) as a item in my toppings (like for scalloped potatoes with whole grain flour/ whole grain bread crumbs. 2.) I put it in with a ratio of Nutritional Yeast, salt, garlic,hempseed/sesame seeds for Faux-parmazan cheeeze sprinkle that I use on potatoes, spaghetti, etc...anywhere parmesan cheese is called for. 3.) in place of any flour or combined with gluten-free flours for baking.

    Healthy regards, Dan

  • wanabwrestler

    5 years ago
    Hello everyone! I was hoping you all could lend me some advice: I am on day 24 of 30 day juice fast (with 1 veggie meal for dinner). I am curious what you all are doing to keep losing AFTER the juice fast is over. What are your eating habits after the fast? Thanks so much for your time in answering as I really need some help in this (I'm a binger food addict, so plain old limiting meal sizes is almost impossible!). ***3 John 1:2 “Beloved, I pray that in all respects you may prosper and be in good health, just as your soul prospers.”*** Sincerely- Rachel =)
  • Barbara

    5 years ago

    Hi Wanab . . . here's what I did. I got two great cookbooks, Forks Over Knives and Eat to Live. Worth every penny, both of them, although there seem to be plenty of great recipes that are free on various websites, including this one (love the meatless Monday ones). I continued (and still do, at least 2 x a day) to juice. I started out with the soup recipes, there are so many and they are incredibly delicious and then added bean, lentil and other dishes. I eat only plant-based meals and continued to lose, although just slower. No sugar, no meat, no processed foods, nothing canned. But otherwise, I feel like I am eating more than I ever have! There are two things I believe to be most important. The first is to plan ahead as much as possible. The second is to have things on hand that are healthy and already prepared - like quinoa. Even if I don't have it prepared, it only takes 15 minutes. And even if it is plain, at least it satisfies, but it is pretty easy to jazz it up a little. Another thing we use for quick, handy, satisfying and ready snacks is celery and hummus. I also prepare extra food when I cook (the recipes in these books make a lot!) and stick it in the freezer for quick and easy last minute meals.

    I should have said three things - the third is to not let myself get too hungry! I try to eat before that happens. Hope this helps at least a little bit. :) You might want to put this question out there on the free-for-all discussions too - I have found that quite helpful.

  • wanabwrestler

    5 years ago
    Thanks for the info! Bought Forks Over Knives based on your suggestion. It's so hard to eat healthy AND find vegan-esk cookbooks that dont include breads or flours (I'm gluten free because of intolerance). The recipes seem easy and tasty! What are some of your favorites? Sincerely, Rachel =)
  • DanMiller BettyRae

    5 years ago

    wanabwrestler -- check out this plantbased wholefood website at: http://www.wholevana.com/recipes/plant-based

    They are the crux of FOK and the community plant-based movement. There you can meal plan, make shopping lists and they cover all the substitute foods you might find necessary to replace animal products, dairy, eggs. Everything I have made from Kim Campbell's recipes are tasty & delicious, plus she uses ingredients that are common to find. Find a few key recipes you enjoy and keep it simple with what Barbara says about food prep and meal planning.

    Most of us are intolerant to the gluten in refined flours. If you choose WHOLE Grains and WHOLE grain flours, or substitute with other things like nut, seed or quinoa flours, you shouldn't experience any issues with sensitivity or intolerance.

    Healthy Regards, Dan Miller ----- Eat & Drink Plants!

  • Barbara

    5 years ago


    Two great things have happened in our new eating lifestyle: 1) received my first Bountifulbasket Friday. Incredible! Got $30 worth of beautiful produce for $15! And a variety! Still trying to figure out what some of this stuff is, but it looks great. 2) found an old Champion juicer in our storage shed that my parents apparently had at some point. Cleaned 'er up, she works like a charm! Much better!



    Anyone have baby bok choy recipes they love? Figured out that's one of our new items.

  • DanMiller BettyRae

    5 years ago

    Barbara, glad you liked your new scalloped potatoe recipe. I will admit that sometimes the plant-based foods may not look appealing but that is because we are not shining them up with excess fats, food stabilizers, fillers, preservatives and food colorings....but yes, you are right about them tasting good, particularly if you use the food flavors themselves and lots of fresh herbs, seeds, garlic/onions and maybe braggs amino acids or soy sauce/tamari.

    I have been told that you can use the champion juicer as both a masticator and a centrifugal juicer. when you masticate (the solid plate goes in the mechanism instead of the screen- which is also what you use to make nut butters) then you press the pulpy mess with a Weller Press to squeeze the juice-- the best juice ever, but a little more work. Talk to Leslie Justice at: http://community.rebootwithjoe.com/profile/leslie-justice-120249 for more details on Champion juicers - she regularly posts videos on juicing with a Champion at: https://www.facebook.com/JuicingForDummies . The centrifugal part with screen is equally as great through and does the messy work for you.

    P.S. day old juice can be used to flavor broths, soups and stews.

    I cover my scalloped potatoes with a coating of hemp hearts, sesame seeds, ground cashews and some cashew flour with a whole grain fine bread crumb. A little drizzle of olive oil and 15 more minutes in the oven uncovered, and it browns the top with a crispy crust.

    Enjoy and Happy Holidays

    healthy regards, Dan

  • Barbara

    5 years ago


    Reporting on Dan's scalloped potatos . . . . mmmmmmmmm. Have used coconut milk for years, but never thought of cooking/baking with it! It honestly didn't look pretty (maybe because I didn't have all the ingredients for the top) but made up for it in taste. Best scalloped potatos I'ver ever eaten! (And I used a regular food processor for slicing - works like a charm and gets me outta the kitchen!) Thanks, Dan!

  • wanabwrestler

    5 years ago


    Thanks Barbera for the articles on microwaves!



    I was already not liking that they could turn chicken into rubber-- so today I bought my first ever convection-broiler-rotisserie oven! I'm so excited! The reviews even said that it heats up leftovers WAY better than microwaves! Huzzah! I cant wait to try it out when I'm done with this 30 day reboot!

  • Barbara

    5 years ago

    Yep, think I am going to bring one home from the city next week, wanabwrestler! I have been shunning my microwave - it really doesn't take that much longer to just throw something in a pan to heat it up. I know I should do more raw veggie eating, but it's just too darn cold for salads right now!

  • Jon

    5 years ago


    made a quinoa and kale pilaf with lemon the other day excellent!!!



    http://food52.com/recipes/2434-one-pot-kale-and-qu...




  • Natshell62

    5 years ago

    That looks delish! I'm gonna have to try that:)

  • Jon

    5 years ago

    i subbed toasted almond slivers for the pine nuts and regular lemon for the meyer lemon and it still was very nice.

*Individual results may vary. Reboots are not intended to treat, cure or prevent any medical or health condition. Reboots are not recommended for everyone, and before commencing a Reboot or any other nutritional or dietary regimen, you should consult with your qualified health care provider in order to assess any potential benefits or risks to you with consideration of your personal medical situation. You should also continue to work closely with your qualified health care provider if you intend to engage in a long-term Reboot. Our Guided Reboot Programs are not advised for women who are pregnant or nursing.